Part of trail system at Tijuana River Valley Regional Park.
Part of the trail system at Tijuana River Valley Regional Park. Photo via sandiegocounty.gov

The San Diego County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Wednesday to apply for $11.6 million in state funding to upgrade the Tijuana River Valley Regional Park.

If the county receives the grant from the California Natural Resources Agency, it will apply it toward a planned $37 million improvement project at the park, according to board Chairman Nathan Fletcher’s office.

In a statement, Fletcher said the “continued pursuit of new funding and planned investments to improve county parks ensures families have beautiful, safe spaces to enjoy the outdoors.”

“The Tijuana River Valley Regional Park will be an even better place for people to go with these funds,” he added.

The 64-acre park project will serve the community of Nestor, located in south San Diego. When completed, the county-operated park will provide new recreation opportunities for disadvantaged residents.

A new park “will also create an intergenerational hub and shared gathering space for friends, families, and neighbors to come and build a community,” according to the county.

Supervisor Nora Vargas, the board vice chairwoman whose district includes Nestor, said the park upgrade is a great economic opportunity.

Fletcher’s office said that as part of the just-launched “Experience the Outdoors” program, the park will be featured in the Parks 101 First-timer Series for camping and host a gardening demonstration in June 2023. It will also be part of the Rad Regional Parks event series next year.

In related grant news, supervisors also unanimously approved the county applying for a $450,000 state grant to promote agricultural sustainability. Supervisor Jim Desmond proposed applying for the money from the Sustainable Agricultural Lands Conservation Program.

He said it will allow the county’s Local Agency Formation Commission and Department of Planning & Development Service to analyze threats to agriculture — including a 20% loss of avocado groves in the Fallbrook area — and make recommendations to keep it sustainable.

City News Service contributed to this article.





Source link

About Author

Ellen Bullock