Four and a half years after its launch, Mercedes is giving the Mercedes A-Class hatch and saloon range a facelift. The 1.5-litre Renault diesel engine has been replaced by the Mercedes 2-litre engine OM654 and the manual gearbox is no longer available. The petrol engines have received a mild hybrid system. Mercedes A-Class facelift has a better standard equipment and slightly exterior changes. 

As we announced a few months ago, Mercedes has decided to abandon manual gearboxes. The A-Class was one of the last models still using a manual gearbox in combination with some engines. With the facelift of the A-Class hatch and saloon, Mercedes is giving up manual gearboxes for good. Thus, the Mercedes A-Class is only available with 7-speed automatic gearboxes (in combination with Renault petrol engines) and 8-speed automatic gearboxes in combination with Mercedes diesel and petrol engines.

 1.5 liter Renault diesel origin replaced by the OM654 Mercedes 2-litre engine

Mercedes is also dropping the 1.5-litre diesel engine of Renault origin in favour of the 2-litre Mercedes engine codenamed OM654. This is the older version of the 2-litre diesel engine with a displacement of 1950 cmc. In the meantime, Mercedes has modified this engine which has now the code name OM654 M (M for modified). The displacement has been increased to 1993 cmc, the injection pressure has been increased from 2500 to 2700 bar and a 48V mild hybrid with integrated starter generator  was introduced.

But the 48V mild hybrid is not available on the OM 654, so only the  petrol engines of the new Mercedes A-Class facelift get a mild hybrid system on 48V with an integrated starter generator that supports the combustion engine with 10 kW (14 hp) at start and when you accelerate. The same 48V mild hybrid system is available for the Mercedes-AMG A 35 4Matic.

At the same time, the PHEV version has an electric motor with increased power from 75 to 80 kW but the total power of the system remains unchanged at 218 hp. The 15.6 kWh battery can be charged at 3.7 kW AC standard and at 11 kW AC optionally instead of 7 kW before.  The clients has also the option to charge their A-Class at DC stations with up to 22 kW in case which the battery is charged from 10 to 80% in only 25 minutes.

Slight design changes 

The new Mercedes A-Class has a redesigned radiator grille and bumper and the bonnet is topped by two power bulges. Also, the rear diffuser is new and the taillights have LEDs as standard while LED headlights are standard from the Progressive line.

The interior is largely unchanged with the mention that multimedia system 10.25-inch screen is now standard  instead of the 7-inch before the facelift. Optionally available as before are the two 10.25-inch screens hidden under the same glass panel that appear to form a single extra-wide screen.

The A-Class takes over from other Mercedes models the new designed display styles for the digital on-board displays (Classic, Sporty, Discreet) combined with three modes (Navigation, Assistance, Service) and seven colour worlds.

Better standard equipment, extras concentrated in packages

The Progressive line comes in three interior colours: black, a luxurious-looking beige and the new, zeitgeisty sage grey. A new, dark carbon-fibre look trim element further enhances both the instrument panel and the doors in these models. The AMG Line features bright brushed aluminium trim and red contrasting topstitching in the ARTICO/MICROCUT seats. The revised steering wheel of the current steering wheel generation, in nappa leather as standard, is compact and matches the high-tech character of the redesigned centre console.

Standard equipment has been enhanced and now includes a reversing camera, the USB Package or the steering wheel in nappa leather. From the Progressive line up LED headlamps, a seat with lumbar support, the Parking Package and the Mirror Package are offered as standard.

Also, according to the new model configuration strategy, Mercedes has narrowed down the list of options and grouped them into a few packages.





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Clarence Choe