By Brent Furdyk.

In his 2011 docuseries “Frozen Planet”, Sir David Attenborough brought viewers on a journey from the Arctic to the Antarctic, winning four Emmys in the process.

Now, the acclaimed British documentary filmmaker is delving even deeper in a new followup series, “Frozen Planet II”.


READ MORE:
Exclusive: Sir David Attenborough Discusses The Importance Of Plants In First Look At ‘The Green Planet’ Documentary

Eleven years later, Sir David returns to the coldest parts of the world to observe the amazing species that thrive there. Going even further than the first series, “Frozen Planet II” also explores life beyond the Poles, witnessing the wildlife dramas that play out in planet’s chilliest places, including high mountains, frozen deserts, snowbound forests and ice-cold oceans.

Polar bear mother and cub, Svalbard, Arctic Norway. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth
Polar bear mother and cub, Svalbard, Arctic Norway. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth
Musk ox are hardy tundra residents who weather conditions all year round and even give birth to their young in early spring, when the snow still covers the ground. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth
Musk ox are hardy tundra residents who weather conditions all year round and even give birth to their young in early spring, when the snow still covers the ground. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth
An Adult Emperor penguin walks away from its chick in Antarctica. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth
An Adult Emperor penguin walks away from its chick in Antarctica. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth
A Siberian Tiger roams the forest in the far east of Russia. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth
A Siberian Tiger roams the forest in the far east of Russia. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth
An adult Polar Bear walks across the sea ice in the Arctic. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth
An adult Polar Bear walks across the sea ice in the Arctic. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth
Many Inuit communities still rely on dog teams to travel on the sea ice. Sled dogs are highly sensitive to the condition of the sea ice. If it is too thin, they will not continue and the sled teams must turn back. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth
Many Inuit communities still rely on dog teams to travel on the sea ice. Sled dogs are highly sensitive to the condition of the sea ice. If it is too thin, they will not continue and the sled teams must turn back. Photo courtesy of BBC Earth

Canadian filming locations included Nunavut (documenting brown bear, musk ox, lemmings and Arctic foxes), Northwest Territories (narwal), Gulf of St. Lawrence (harp seal) and Edmonton (bison and wolves).

“More than a decade ago, the first series of ‘Frozen Planet’ examined life in the Arctic and the Antarctic. In this series we will explore all of Earth’s frozen habitats. But just as we’re beginning to understand its wildlife, we are recognizing an alarming truth. Our frozen habitats are disappearing at a faster rate than ever before. And never has it been more important to understand what is going on in these icy territories,” said Sir David in a statement.


READ MORE:
Exclusive: Sir David Attenborough Discusses ‘Vivid’ Documentary ‘Dinosaur Apocalypse’ Ahead Of Canadian Premiere

“Looking down on our planet, it may come as a surprise to find just how much of it is blanketed in snow and ice,” he continued. “These vast frozen wildernesses cover more than a fifth of our planet. Yet some areas are so remote and inhospitable that even today the closest we’ve come to exploring them is from space. More than a decade ago, the first series of Frozen Planet examined life in the Arctic and the Antarctic. In this series we will explore all of Earth’s frozen habitats… from its highest peaks… to its snowbound deserts… to deep beneath the ice. Between them, they contain an astonishing array of animals, many that are found nowhere else on Earth. We will watch the extraordinary ways by which they manage to survive. Using new technology, such as racer-drones… we’ll gain a new insight into their remarkable lives. But just as we’re beginning to understand its wildlife, we are recognizing an alarming truth. Our frozen habitats are disappearing at a faster rate than ever before. And never has it been more important to understand what is going on in these icy territories.”


READ MORE:
Sir David Attenborough Narrates ‘The Mating Game’ Exclusive Sneak Peek Ahead Of Canadian Premiere

Asked if humanity still had time to save the planet from catastrophic climate change, Sir David replied, “We can do it. It’s within our power to do it. We can do it… we must do it. Then, there will be a future for the planet.”

“Frozen Planet II” premieres Sunday, Nov. 13 on BBC Earth.





Source link

About Author

Ellen Bullock