Memorials to students killed in Uvalde
Flowers, toys, and other objects remember the victims of the deadliest U.S. school mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, REUTERS/Veronica G. Cardenas

All members of the San Diego congressional delegation except Republican Rep. Darrell Issa voted for two bills intended to reduce gun violence in the aftermath of the Uvalde, Texas, school shooting.

The House of Representatives voted Wednesday on the Protecting Our Kids Act and Thursday on the Federal Extreme Risk Protection Order Act, passing both along party lines.

The legislation would raise the minimum age to purchase a semi-automatic rifle from 18 to 21, outlaw both ghost guns and high-capacity magazines, and institute a federal “red flag law” to prohibit a potentially dangerous individual from purchasing or possessing a firearm.

Democratic Reps. Sara Jacobs, Mike Levin, Scott Peters and Juan Vargas all voted for both bills.

“It’s painful to recognize that the loss of countless innocent lives over decades led us here today,” said Peters after the votes. “Passing these bills to prevent more gun violence reflects the will of the American people.”

“Now, we will continue fighting to get additional life-saving legislation over the finish line. I will not rest until the job is done,” he said.

Peters said gun violence in America is responsible for more than 45,000 deaths per year, with 100 Americans killed daily in murders, suicides and accidents involving a firearm.

Recent mass shootings at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde and a supermarket in Buffalo were both carried out by 18-year-olds legally armed with semi-automatic assault rifles.

The House legislation faces an uncertain future in the Senate, which Republicans are likely to filibuster the bills.

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Ellen Bullock